Gil Vasquez

Gil Vasquez

Artist

My little precious Gil has the best artwork in the world and no one is better. Not Picasso, not Van Gogh, NO ONE!!

Gil's Madre

Mother, Vasquez Company, LLC

My little precious Gil has the best artwork in the world and no one is better. Not Picasso, not Van Gogh, NO ONE!!

Gil's Madre

Mother, Vasquez Company, LLC

Contact Me

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Gil Vasquez Fine Art logo - 500 x 90

Gilbert Vasquez is an accomplished artist of over 50 years in a wide variety of media that include: drawing, painting, illustration, murals, technical illustration, graphic design, web design, multimedia, animation, and woodcarving. He has also earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Fullerton.

Gilbert, best known as Gil and the youngest of 10 children, was born in Santa Ana, California. His family was immersed in a rich environment filled with artistic and musical talents, and strong religious beliefs. One of his earliest memories is the pride he felt for his father’s expertise and skillset in the building trades, as well as for his mother’s pursuit in domestic crafts such as knitting, crocheting, and cooking.

Eager to explore all that was around him, Gilbert’s first introduction to the fine arts came before he was old enough to attend school. Looking through an encyclopedia set he found a black and white reproduction of Vincent Van Gough’s “Starry Night,” and never forgot the impact that the image had upon him. He remembers hoping, as he carefully studied the picture that someone would take him outdoors on the night that sky occurred, so he could see it with his own eyes.

From the ages of 6 to 12, Gilbert went to Catholic School, as it was his mother’s desire that he become a priest. But Gilbert realized at a young age that he had quite a different calling. He was attracted more to the arts than the biblical studies, yet it was the storytelling he read on pages that inspired him to create large scale visual narratives. When he was 14, his parents took him to Mexico City where he saw the University City Central Library by Juan O’Gorman and the murals of David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera. While visiting the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, he was profoundly struck by Diego Rivera’s mural titled: “Man at the Crossroads.” He studied it for a long time and aspired to produce such work.

His interest in the art form continued through college where he was nominated by art historian Dr. Shifra Goldman to join a special mural workshop being organized at the studio of the master muralist, David Alfaro Siqueiros, in Vera Cruz, Mexico. Unfortunately, Siqueiros’ untimely death ended this project to train a new generation of muralists. Around this time, he had also been introduced to the Director of the Academia de San Carlos in Mexico City and they had discussed the possibility of Gilbert studying at San Carlos, but unfortunately, other factors in his life didn’t allow him to pursue this opportunity. However, throughout Gilbert’s many projects, his strong desire and ability to create continue to surface.

Since then, he has continued to provide project support through collaborative works with artists such as Sergio O’ Cadiz and Emigdio Vasquez. He has been commissioned by California State University, Fullerton for his specialized skills to remove and preserve murals. His best-known works are the murals he painted and dedicated to the Latino Community in Santa Ana titled: “Our Image” (homage to Siqueiros) and “Receiving Corn” (homage to Jorge Gonzalez Camarena). These works were at one time on the old Southern California Gas Company building on Sycamore and Second Street in downtown Santa Ana. He also painted a mural at California State University, Fullerton in the Chicano Research Department in the library titled: “Our 21st Century.” In 1977 Gilbert painted a mural for the City of Westminster titled: “The Assumption of the Virgin Mary,” it’s the only mural of his still in existence.

Featured Work:

Listed in: ARTE CHICANO, A comprehensive annotated bibliography of Chicano Art, (1965 -1981). By Shifra M. Goldman and Tomasy-Frausto. Chicano studies Library Publications Unit, University of California Berkeley, 1985

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